Using Grunt, bootstrap, Compass and SASS in a Drupal sub theme

2 minute read

If you have a separate front end design team from your Drupal developers, you will know that after static pages are moved into a Drupal theme there can be a huge gap in structure between the original files and the final Drupal site.

We wanted to bridge the gap between our theme developers, UX designers, front end coders, and create an all encompassing boilerplate that could be used as a starting point for any project and then easily ported into Drupal.

After thinking about this task for a few weeks it was clear that the best way forward was to use Grunt to automate all of our tasks and create a scalable, well structured sub theme that all of our coders can use to start any project.

What is Grunt?

Grunt is a Javascript task runner that allows you to automate repetitive tasks such as file minifying files, javascript linting, CSS preprocessing, and even reloading your browser.

Just like bootstrap, there are many resources and a vast amount of plugins available for Grunt that can automate any task you could think of, plus it is very easy to write your own, so setting Grunt as a standard for our boilerplate was an easy decision.

The purpose of this post

We use bootstrap in most projects and recently switched to using SASS for CSS preprocessing bundled with Compass, so for the purpose of this tutorial we will create a simple bootstrap sub theme that utilises Grunt & Compass to compile SASS files and automatically reloads our browser every time a file is changed.

You can then take this approach and use the best Grunt plugins that suit your project.

Step 1. Prerequisites

To use Grunt you will need node.js and ruby installed on your system. Open up terminal, and type:

#container {
  float: left;
  margin: 0 -240px 0 0;
  width: 100%;
}
.highlight {
  margin: 0;
  padding: 1em;
  font-family: $monospace;
  font-size: $type-size-7;
  line-height: 1.8;
}
<nav class="pagination" role="navigation">
  {% if page.previous %}
    <a href="{{ site.url }}{{ page.previous.url }}" class="btn" title="{{ page.previous.title }}">Previous article</a>
  {% endif %}
  {% if page.next %}
    <a href="{{ site.url }}{{ page.next.url }}" class="btn" title="{{ page.next.title }}">Next article</a>
  {% endif %}
</nav><!-- /.pagination -->
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<nav class="pagination" role="navigation">
  {% if page.previous %}
    <a href="{{ site.url }}{{ page.previous.url }}" class="btn" title="{{ page.previous.title }}">Previous article</a>
  {% endif %}
  {% if page.next %}
    <a href="{{ site.url }}{{ page.next.url }}" class="btn" title="{{ page.next.title }}">Next article</a>
  {% endif %}
</nav><!-- /.pagination -->
module Jekyll
  class TagIndex < Page
    def initialize(site, base, dir, tag)
      @site = site
      @base = base
      @dir = dir
      @name = 'index.html'
      self.process(@name)
      self.read_yaml(File.join(base, '_layouts'), 'tag_index.html')
      self.data['tag'] = tag
      tag_title_prefix = site.config['tag_title_prefix'] || 'Tagged: '
      tag_title_suffix = site.config['tag_title_suffix'] || '&#8211;'
      self.data['title'] = "#{tag_title_prefix}#{tag}"
      self.data['description'] = "An archive of posts tagged #{tag}."
    end
  end
end

Code Blocks in Lists

Indentation matters. Be sure the indent of the code block aligns with the first non-space character after the list item marker (e.g., 1.). Usually this will mean indenting 3 spaces instead of 4.

  1. Do step 1.
  2. Now do this:

    def print_hi(name)
      puts "Hi, #{name}"
    end
    print_hi('Tom')
    #=> prints 'Hi, Tom' to STDOUT.
    
  3. Now you can do this.

GitHub Gist Embed

An example of a Gist embed below.